highlight image
  • Heart
  • Digestion

Chia-Flax

The Fiber Starters

  • Supports heart and digestive health, and lower body weight*
  • Nutrient powerhouses*
  • Organic chia and flax seeds
  • Mix with protein powder, or sprinkle on yogurt
See supplement facts
Non-GMO
Non-GMO
Vegetarian
Vegetarian
Gluten-Free
Gluten-Free
Vegan
Vegan
The basics
Strong Research
Strong Research
As early as 1500 BC, chia seeds were consumed by Mayan and Aztec people in Central America as a food known for its therapeutic qualities. Chia and flax are nutritionally dense sources of essential fatty acids and dietary fiber, both well-established nutrients for supporting heart health. Fiber is also vital for a healthy digestive system.*
The basics
fact highlight

Did you know?

Chia seeds come from the plant Salvia hispanica and are considered part of the mint family.

Research and benefits

View all research

Supports digestive health

Chia and flax seeds are natural sources of dietary and soluble fiber, both of which are vital for a healthy digestive system by increasing fecal bulk and stool frequency, and decreasing intestinal transit time. Fiber is also key for gut microbiome health, and increasing your intake can have an immediate impact on microbiota health.*

Number of studies

2

Years of studies

2015-2018

Double-blind placebo

No

Chia and flax seeds are natural sources of dietary and soluble fiber, both of which are vital for a healthy digestive system by increasing fecal bulk and stool frequency, and decreasing intestinal transit time. Fiber is also key for gut microbiome health, and increasing your intake can have an immediate impact on microbiota health.*

Nutrient dense

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) highlights the importance of omega-3 fatty acids in vegetarian diets. Since vegetarian and vegan diets have low intakes of EPA and DHA fatty acids (mostly found in fish and marine algae), it is vital to consume plant sources rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Flax and chia are two of the most concentrated plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, particularly alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA). Since EPA and DHA are synthesized from ALA, it is the AND’s position that omega-3 needs of healthy individuals can be sufficiently met through ALA entirely.*

Number of studies

2

Years of studies

2015-2017

Double-blind placebo

No

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) highlights the importance of omega-3 fatty acids in vegetarian diets. Since vegetarian and vegan diets have low intakes of EPA and DHA fatty acids (mostly found in fish and marine algae), it is vital to consume plant sources rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Flax and chia are two of the most concentrated plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, particularly alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA). Since EPA and DHA are synthesized from ALA, it is the AND’s position that omega-3 needs of healthy individuals can be sufficiently met through ALA entirely.*

Supports heart health

The links between both dietary fiber and omega-3 fatty acids and heart health are widely accepted. The Institute of Medicine has established fiber intake levels to achieve the lowest risk of coronary heart disease, and nine major clinical studies reported that alpha-Linolenic acid, an essential fatty acid, is inversely related with primary cardiovascular events. In other clinical studies, it was found that eating 30-50 grams of milled flax daily for 4 weeks reduced blood total and LDL-cholesterol.*

Number of studies

1

Years of studies

2015

Double-blind placebo

No

The links between both dietary fiber and omega-3 fatty acids and heart health are widely accepted. The Institute of Medicine has established fiber intake levels to achieve the lowest risk of coronary heart disease, and nine major clinical studies reported that alpha-Linolenic acid, an essential fatty acid, is inversely related with primary cardiovascular events. In other clinical studies, it was found that eating 30-50 grams of milled flax daily for 4 weeks reduced blood total and LDL-cholesterol.*

Supports healthy body weight

Dietary fiber consumption is believed to contribute to lower body weights, in part due to fiber’s ability to increase feelings of fullness. Results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial found that appetite was decreased in individuals consuming chia compared to a control. Additionally, a 2012 meta-analysis found that individuals with increased dietary fiber and whole grain consumption showed a reduction in weight gain.*

Number of studies

4

Years of studies

2010-2017

Double-blind placebo

Yes

Dietary fiber consumption is believed to contribute to lower body weights, in part due to fiber’s ability to increase feelings of fullness. Results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial found that appetite was decreased in individuals consuming chia compared to a control. Additionally, a 2012 meta-analysis found that individuals with increased dietary fiber and whole grain consumption showed a reduction in weight gain.*

Frequently asked questions

Find the right supplements for your unique needs.

Take the quiz